FOR EARLY CHILDHOOD ADVOCATES

Reports & Research

Where It All Began: The Perry Pre-School & Abecedarian Studies

Long-Term Study of Adults Who Received High-Quality Early Childhood Care: Education shows economic and social gains, less crime.

A landmark, long-term study of the effects of high-quality early care and education on low-income three- and four-year-olds shows that adults at age 40 who participated in a preschool program in their early years have higher earnings, are more likely to hold a job, have committed fewer crimes, and are more likely to have graduated from high school. Overall, the study documented a return to society of more than $16 for every tax dollar invested in the early care and education program. Learn more about the Perry Preschool Study 

Early Learning, Later Success: The Abecedarian Study

On October 21, 1999, researchers from the Frank Porter Graham Child Development Center released a report that demonstrates long-lasting benefits for children enrolled in an experimental early education program. Researchers followed these children until age 21. Their findings go beyond demonstrating school readiness and success to identifying positive educational and social outcomes during young adulthood. The longitudinal study recently compared the treated group with the control group and found significant differences in their abilities and achievements. Learn more about the Abecedarian Study 

Helena-Specific Information

In 2012, the Early Childhood Coalition of the Greater Helena Area completed a comprehensive needs assessment. View the entire Needs Assessment In 2013, the Early Childhood Coalition of the Greater Helena Area completed a strategic plan to guide the coalition’s work. View the entire Strategic Plan

Montana-Specific Information

The Montana Early Learning Roadmap: A Community Framework

We know that kids who attend quality preschool are more likely to read at grade level and more likely to graduate from high school. We also know that locating and being able to affors quality early childhood education is challenging for families across Montana. In September 2016, the Montana Office of Public Instruction released a report detailing a way to use an already successful process, Graduation Matters Montana, to build and strengthen early childhood education in communities throughout Montana. The Montana Early Learning Roadmap: A Community Framework report gives examples of how diverse Montana communities are working to expand access to early learning opportunities for all children.

Child Care Aware of America: 2014 State Fact Sheets

For the United States to fully participate in the 21st-century global economy, it needs to think of child care as equally a workforce support for parents and early education for young children. The Child Care in America: 2014 State Fact Sheets is critical for child care advocates, policymakers and program administrators as they make decisions about child care programs and expenditures. This annual report uses federal and national data and information from state Child Care Resource and Referral agencies and other state agencies to look at: – Family characteristics related to the need for child care – Use of child care – Supply of child care – Cost of child care – The child care workforce – Services provided by child care resource and referral agencies View the 2014 Child Care in the State of: Montana Report.  View the full 2014 Child Care in America Report. 

Fight Crime Invest in Kids: Saddle Up, Montana. It’s Time to Make Early Investment in Kids

Fight Crime: Invest in Kids is a national, bipartisan, nonprofit, anti-crime organization. The organization has  a membership of more than 5,000 police chiefs, sheriffs, district attorneys, and other law enforcement leaders and violence survivors.  There are 78 members, mostly sheriffs, policymakers, and other law enforcement officials, that want to stop crime before it happens by keeping focused on some of Montana’s wildest individuals: our babies, preschoolers, and elementary school children! View the full Saddle Up, Montana Report

Fight Crime Invest in Kids: The Business Case in Montana for Early Childhood Investments

According to John Pepper, former CEO of Proctor & Gamble, ““ In business, we rarely have the luxury of making an investment decision with as much evidence as we have to support the economic value of investing in early childhood development and education… Put bluntly, in my terms, they are a financial nobrainer. The only question is ‘how strong is the ROI?’ The answer: Two or three or more to one”. Read the full Business Case in Montana for Early Childhood Investments Report 

Investing in Pre-K: Frequently Asked Questions

FAQ sheet from the Montana Budget & Policy Center (MBPC, November 11, 2014). Montana has the opportunity to invest in quality, public pre-Kindergarten and strengthen Montana’s children and families, our communities, and the state’s economy. Pre-K helps parents work, reduces education costs, increases future earnings of participants, and reduces the state’s spending on corrections. Read the Investing in Pre-K: Frequently Asked Questions sheet

Strengthening Families, Strengthening Our Economy: The Economic Benefits of Pre-Kindergarten

Investing now in kids and families will strengthen Montana’s children and families, our communities, and the state’s economy. Quality, public pre-K helps parents work, reduces education costs, increases future earnings of participants, and reduces the state’s spending on corrections. Montana is currently one of only eight states not investing in its youngest learners. (MPBC, September 9, 2014) Read the full Strengthening Families, Strengthening Our Economy: The Economic Benefits of Pre-Kindergarten report

The High Cost of Child Care: State Funding for Pre-K Would Benefit Montana Families

State funding for pre-Kindergarten is an opportunity to strengthen our state’s economy and help Montana’s hard working families. The cost of high-quality child care is a significant obstacle for many working families. Many parents face frustrating choices: pay an excessive portion of their income in child care costs, choose lower-quality care, or quit their jobs. (MPBC, July 8, 2014) Read the full The High Cost of Child Care: State Funding for Pre-K Would Benefit Montana Families report

Pre-Kindergarten: An Investment in Montana’s Future

Early childhood is a crucial time of learning and growth for children. Montana is one of only ten states with no state-funded pre-kindergarten system. Studies have shown that investing in pre-k is one of the most effective investments a state can make, with significant benefits for children and the state’s fiscal health. (MPBC, December 11, 2013) Read the full Pre-Kindergarten: An Investment in Montana’s Future report

2014 Kids Count Data Book: State Trends in Child Well Being

As a nation, we are obsessed with data and indicators when it comes to the economy. We track the gross domestic product, the Consumer Price Index, unemployment, inventories, housing starts, interest rates and so on. We monitor these numbers because they are critical to understanding where our economy is heading, and because we want to be able to respond forcefully if the numbers signal developing problems. We should be equally, if not more, concerned about the data that tell us how our children are doing: The well being of our country’s children is the most important indicator of our long-term economic and social future. View the full 2014 Kids Count Data Book

ZERO to THREE National Center for Children, Infants, and Families: State Baby Facts Montana

The facts about the 37,122 infants and toddlers in Montana tell us an important story of what is like to be a very young child in the state. View the full State Baby Facts: Montana Report

National Studies

Executive Office of the President: The Economics of Early Childhood Investments

Early childhood, beginning in infancy, is a period of profound advances in reasoning, language acquisition, and problem solving, and importantly, a child’s environment can dramatically influence the degree and pace of these advances. By supporting development when children are very young, early childhood development and education programs can complement parental investments and produce large benefits to children, parents, and society. View the full Economics of Early Childhood Investments Report 

Fight Crime: Invest in Kids: Savings Now, Savings Later

Businesses need employees who are job-ready, team-capable, and well-prepared – but we’re not getting them. This failing workforce pipeline can be repaired, but we have to start early. View the full Savings Now, Savings Later Report 

Other Studies

Association of Child Poverty, Brain Development, and Academic Achievement

Abstract: “Children living in poverty generally perform poorly in school, with markedly lower standardized test scores and lower educational attainment. The longer children live in poverty, the greater their academic deficits. These patterns persist to adulthood, contributing to lifetime-reduced occupational attainment.” Read full study from JAMA Pediatrics.

Research Brief (July 2014): Adverse Childhood Experiences: National and State-Level Prevalence

Adverse childhood experiences (ACEs) are potentially traumatic events that can have negative, lasting effects on health and well-being. In this brief, the authors describe the prevalence of one or more ACEs among children ages birth through 17, as reported by their parents, using nationally representative data from the 2011/12 National Survey of Children’s Health (NSCH). They estimate the prevalence of eight specific ACEs for the U.S., contrasting the prevalence of specific ACEs among the states and between children of different age groups. Learn more about the ACEs Research Brief 

The Heckman Equation

This website compiles and presents in accessible format the work of Nobel Prize-winning University of Chicago economics professor James Heckman, which seeks to understand the great gains to be had by investing in the early and equal development of human potential.